Ed Weissman pulse
ED WEISSMAN
Programmer • Writer • Teacher
Y in

Eddie's Law of Pulse

"Deep Awareness is inversely related to the square of the distance from the source."

How do you know what's going on if you're not there?

Ask a restaurant manager. Or a bartender. Or the manager of a retail shop. Or a call center or an office. Or the supervisor of a factory or warehouse floor. What do you think they'd say?

How about a teacher? Or a babysitter? Or a nurse? How about a battlefield general?

Ask anyone responsible for something, "How do you know what's going on if you're not there?" and you'll always get the same answer: "You won't."

Unless they were an I.T. manager.

MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
We must fix JDA's inventory calculations.
missMgmt
I'll assemble a team and get this project going.
Days Since Last Bug: 0
dunningKruger
Let's rewrite all of JDA! We'll make it much better!
garyRiggs
Huh?
We replaced JDA 3 years ago.

I grew up in a family of small business people who absolutely had to be at work or they'd go broke. They'd say, "I have to be there to know what the customer wants," or "I have to be there to make sure everything runs smoothly," or my personal favorite, "If I'm not there, they'll rob me blind."

I learned myself when I started working. You can't be doing the books in the back office when customers are begging for coffee. Or going on break when a bus pulls into the parking lot. And if you don't answer the phone by the third ring, they'll buy from someone else (and your boss will kick your butt).

So when I became a programmer, I had trouble adjusting to "I.T. Exceptions to Everyone Else's Rules". I've had over 100 I.T. bosses and maybe four of them had any idea what was going on. I got so tired of being asked, "What are you working on?" I started responding, "Why don't you know?" That's when I was first labeled "Not a Team Player".

Funny, I was never "Not a Team Player" before I became a programmer. And no one ever asked me, "What are you working on?" Imagine the boss asking that question to a waitress, or a policeman, or an accountant, or even a bookie. To get that dysfunctional, you have to go into I.T.

Days Since Last Bug: 0
dunningKruger
What are you working on?
kimLee
Read my
email.
garyRiggs
Read my
status report.
floChart
Read my resignation letter.

What makes I.T. so special? Where your boss doesn't know what you're doing? Or tells you how to do something without telling you what to do? Or changes your priorities every 14 minutes? Or wonders why you got nothing done after spending seven hours in their meetings that day?

I asked my first mentor what makes I.T. so special and he told me, "In order survive in I.T., all you have to do is stay two steps ahead of your boss, and what idiot can't do that?" I think it's a little more complicated than that.



Science Applies to Humans Too

Inverse Square is a law of physics that states that a specified quantity or intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from its source. Move twice as far away and the signal gets four times as faint. Three times as far and the signal gets nine times as faint. Scientific. And intuitive.

This law has been proven in many applications: light, sound, radiation, electricity, waves, particles, and all kinds of energy. Then why not human understanding? That's energy, isn't it? It only makes sense... Move twice as far from the subject matter expert and know one fourth as much. Move three times as far from the technical expert and know one ninth as much. Move all the way into management and know nothing.

The Math of Pulse

0123456789
100%


under
stand
ing


25%

11%
6%

Check out the severity of this geometric curve. For argument's sake, let's call a unit of distance a "mindshare". If you're working on something and you're at the source, you have the potential for 100% understanding. But get interrupted or move to something else and now you're twice as far away and have only 25% as much understanding. Two metashifts later, when you're four mindshares from the source, you only have 6% as much understanding. Beyond that, forget it.

Now consider that most I.T. managers never do the work they manage (and many never have), oversee dozens of projects at the same time, and constantly shift attention between email, chat, meetings, emergencies, and updating their Lunkedin profiles. It's no wonder they have their finger on the pulse of nothing!

In order to have your finger on the pulse of something, you need two things. You need to know it's there. And you need to be close enough to it for your finger to reach it.

I call this "Pulse", when the intersection of Existence and Proximity results in Deep Awareness.

Good Thing Someone Knows What's Going On
Distance: 1   Understanding: 100%

MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
We have to rewrite Order Entry to handle new business!
So get some resources and write a project plan.
CLOSED TICKETS
- add Std Cost
- add Box IDs
- add WIP Report
- add AWS API
- add XML feed
- add Dropdown
- add colors
OPEN TICKETS
- fix Std Cost
- fix Box IDs
- fix WIP Report
- fix AWS API
- fix XML feed
- fix Dropdown
- fix colors
paulaNomial
That'll never work. We don't have the source code.
MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler

So?
 

As I.T. Director for Dark Business, Inc., a manufacturer of industrial lighting, I sat in the monthly Excutive Planning Meeting. Eight of us were trying to figure out how to satisfy Sterling Supply, our biggest customer. They had 20% of our business and were frustrated getting finished goods delivered from us in New Jersey to their Colorado warehouse.

Our team, led by General Manager Nero McKay, fresh out of rehab, came up with the brilliant idea of assembling the lighting fixtures in Sterling's neighborhood instead of our own. "Dick, you go to Denver and rent light industrial space. Henry, make sure we have room for raw materials. Don, go out there and hire enough workers. Eddie, get hardware and software in place. And Frank, take care of all of the paperwork."

A month later we presented our plan to our Group Vice President, Jack Donegan, who immediately blew it up. "Ah, guys. There are a few problems with your plan."

"For starters, Sterling would have to triple their business just to break even on the overhead. We'd have to hire special inspectors we already have in New Jersey for military, aerospace, and marine lighting. We couldn't use housewives or non-union contractors for light assembly like we do here, so that would kill our margins. I don't know where we'd get board time from electical engineers for Sterling's specialty products. And we're two hours ahead of them, so we'd always be behind the eight ball for expediting."

There was one of him and eight of us, yet not one of us thought of any of these things. Why? What made Jack Donegan so special? Because he had his finger on the pulse of everything. He had already been with the people and in the places that mattered.

Ever since, I used to joke with my workmates, "None of us even amounts to one eighth of a Donegan." Thirty years later that's still true, especially in I.T. That's where I got the idea of tieing Pulse to Inverse Square. Move away from the source and lose touch very quickly.

Pay Attention and Listen!
Distance: 1   Understanding: 100%

kimLee
Wow! Did you hear that? What was that?!?
garyRiggs
Yes! I think a truck slammed into the loading dock!
yogeshV
Or maybe that new press in Department 24 malfunctioned!
floChart
All I heard was someone taking the last donut.

Bill Hrisa was showing me what we were manufacturing in Building 26. I was a new programmer at Ancient Electric and Bill would be one of my prime users. Building 26 had hundreds of machines spread over 4 acres with 500 workers reporting to him.

Suddenly Bill stopped and said, "Shhhh! Listen! Be quiet and follow me." We double-stepped down a long walkway to the Conversion Department when Bill turned and yelled, "Why is PP26 doing EC-11s? It's supposed to be pressing EC-22s for Riley! They have to be shipped today! I told you! Now rip this machine down and set it up right!"

How could Bill could tell from a quarter mile away through an industrial jungle that the candence of a 10 ton punch press wasn't right? I can answer that in one word: Pulse.

Bill had his finger on the pulse of every aspect of his operation. He had to. One mistake, like the PP26 foul-up, could kill us. If he hadn't caught that, we would have wasted raw material on the wrong finished good. We would have had nowhere to store it. We would have failed to meet a promise to an important customer. And we would have permanently blown $100,000 in lost absorption.

Like Jack Donegan, Bill Hrisa had to have Pulse. The stakes were far too high for him not to.

Your Head is Always in the Game
Distance: 1   Understanding: 100%

alGorithm
Great news! If we amend our Order Entry software...
We'll get $300 million in new Government business!
CLOSED TICKETS
- add Std Cost
- add Box IDs
- add WIP Report
- add AWS API
- add XML feed
- add Dropdown
- add colors
OPEN TICKETS
- fix Std Cost
- fix Box IDs
- fix WIP Report
- fix AWS API
- fix XML feed
- fix Dropdown
- fix colors
paulaNomial
I heard about that. It'll take us about about 6 weeks.
MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
We can't do it. Accounting has us in code freeze.

Larry Nelson, Foodservice General Manager at Conneaut Lake Park was my boss and first "mentor of pulse". Larry was responsible for 15 facilities and catering for thousands of people. Nothing got by him. No matter what was going on, somehow Larry knew about it.

Whenever I bumped into Larry in the cafeteria, I was surprised by the things he'd remind me about. "Frank's expecting you to pick up your beans for Friday's picnic at three. Dale has two more teenagers to crack eggs for you Saturday night so let me know how they work out. And double-check that Greg straightened out those cases in Walk-in Number Three."

Larry wrote up every assignment, every work schedule, every menu, even every recipe. He made things work like a precision machine and instinctively knew what could go wrong and followed-up on them. If I ever messed up the slightest thing, I knew Larry would remind me. "Those ovens should be preheated to 325 by three o'clock this time!" How could one person keep track of so many things?

Larry became so deeply connected to work, sometimes he lost perspective. Once when we were walking down the street, he dropped everything and said, "That would be the perfect spot for a Coke machine." (He was right.) When his wife asked where he'd like dessert, he answered, "In Building 26 during the shift change." And he got so used to eating hamburgers upside down, that's how he diapered his daughter.

But with Larry's "finger on the pulse" of work, I never worried about a thing. I never worried that we would be surprised by something that should have been routine. Or that things would go desperately wrong. Or that we would stay up all night (or all week) fixing stuff. Or that we would go out of business. I never worried about these things because I knew that Larry already did and he took care of them.

Once I became a programmer, I never had that feeling again.

So That's Why We're Always Waiting!
Distance: 2   Understanding: 25%

MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
I'm sick and tired of you programmers being late!
Days Since Last Bug: 0
dunningKruger
Why hasn't any of this been moved to production?
garyRiggs
It's done. We've just been waiting for Nero to approve it.
MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler

Oh.
 

Henry Thomas and I were having lunch at Newark Airport, looking out at the tarmac, waiting for our flight. Henry and I had gotten together to build and market a small business system. I was the programmer. Henry, an industrial engineer, designed the application.

Suddenly Henry looked at his watch and hollered, "It's been 22 minutes since the baggage door opened and not a single bag has come off that plane!" Until then, I hadn't even noticed. There were two baggage handlers chatting, neither working.

Like Bill Hrisa, Henry noticed everything, even stuff that had nothing to do with work. He watched. He listened. He even "felt" what was happening. That's what made him so good at design. He knew data that mattered that no one else ever noticed. At one customer he said, "We have three different people counting every pallet. What's the sense in that? We need to start there. That's the key!"

Henry, like Bill Hrisa, Jack Donegan, and Larry Nelson, seemed to have natural radar to always have his finger on the pulse on what was going on. His was so strong, he couldn't turn it off. Sometimes it got him into trouble (Mind your own business!), but usually it uncovered the Rosetta stone of the problem. He taught me about pulse. But I had to develop mine without his natural inclination.

Thanks to Henry's Pulse, we got to the root of the problem before anyone else. And we also finally figured out why we always waited so long for our luggage.

Dude! Check it out!
Distance: 3   Understanding: 11%

MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
Get some cafe snacks for the Q.A. meeting with Jerry!
Get
More
Coffee
Set up
Happy
Hour
Hide
from
Nero
Bet
on
Bears
Bring
some
Donuts
Take
Long
Lunch
scrumBell
Norma already cancelled the Q.A. project.
CLOSED TICKETS
- add Std Cost
- add Box IDs
- add WIP Report
- add AWS API
- add XML feed
- add Dropdown
- add colors
OPEN TICKETS
- fix Std Cost
- fix Box IDs
- fix WIP Report
- fix AWS API
- fix XML feed
- fix Dropdown
- fix colors
paulaNomial
Jerry is on vacation until next week.
helenWaite
And the cafe closed at 2:00.

At RussellStoll, Steve Long reported to me as an I.T. Admin. But he was not your typical enterprise employee. He was a professional musician with a day job to make ends meet. Like many artists, Steve was unusually creative and had incredible Pulse, unfortunately for everything except his own job.

Steve was responsible for data entry, compliance, support, and report distribution. He was everywhere, befriended everyone, and knew pretty much everything that was going on. If I asked if the nightly batch was OK, he'd say, Dude! I don't know, but check it out! If Sue doesn't take maternity leave by Friday, that baby's gonna pop out right here on these month-end reports!"

Steve's favorite phrase was "Check it out!" and he said it fifty times a day. He had his finger on the pulse of everything, often important stuff that no one else ever noticed. He'd say, "Dude! Check it out! I don't know why we're spending $30,000 a month on ABK when Charlie just throws out those reports and reads the same data off the machine monitors."

I started using Steve as a Business Analyst and he became the best one I've ever known. I suppose that breaking down a business process may not be that much different from composing, performing, and refining a song.

I still remember telling Steve, "Dude! Check it out! If we can just find a way for techies to have your Pulse, they'd be unstoppable!" He's out of I.T., making music full-time now, so he probably doesn't care. That's why I'm telling you.

Project Molasses
Distance: 4   Understanding: 6%

helenWaite
Not a single project has moved to production.
ezachOverflow
Everything is being held up in the Q.A. queue.
MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
I had no idea! I will put a stop to this!
floChart
That's what you said last month.

At Fly-By-Night Aerospace, I was beside myself that none of my work ever went anywhere. I took a few days to write software and pass it on to the next stage, but six months later, it was still in the same place! At one point, I had 75 completed programs lost in I.T. la-la-land, never to be heard from again.

Every day for months, in the "Road Blocks" part of our daily stand-up, I brought this up. I'd say, "What's the point of doing any work if it's not going anywhere?" My fellow programmers just laughed, thinking I was joking.

So I finally prepared a report of what happened to my six most recent projects. I even included suggestions to address the causes. I named it "Project Molasses". When I distributed it at the stand-up, the laughing stopped.

PROJECT MOLASSES

Project Dev UAT Mods Status
Cost Change 3 days 5 mos 27live
Shortages 3 days 6 mos 14 UAT
UK Parts 3 wks 9 wks 21 UAT
PO Changes 1 day 3 mos 8 wrong
Order Part# 1 day 6 mos 0 wait
Queue Rpt 1 day 6 mos 0 wait

UAT = User Acceptance Testing

14 other Tickets in Queue waiting for programs locked by other projects.


Suggestions:

1. I.T. included in Systems Analysis from Day 1. (Project Manager / Business Analyst)

2. Tech Lead (Subject Matter Expert) included in Systems Analysis from Day 1 (no suprises).

3. All contingencies identified before work begins: training, other projects, locations, departments

4. Backup user for UAT identified on Day 1.

5. UAT scheduled in advance.

6. UAT before Peer Review & Code Review (to avoid git hell).

7. Extensive formal business training for I.T.

Everyone knew what I was talking about because it was also happening to them. Every project was sent to us programmers, labeled "Emergency", "ASAP", "#1 Priority", or my favorite, "Needed Yesterday". But none of the pre-programming legwork had been done. No Business Requirements (BIG FAT WHAT). No Technical Specs (BIG FAT HOW). No Project Plan (BIG FAT WHEN. No Test Plan (BIG FAT CHECK). Just, "You're pretty smart. You figure it out."

What happens when programmers write programs without any idea of what they need to write? They're wrong. But nobody knows until Test Time. Every time a user found something that was not what they wanted, it was labeled a "bug" and sent back. So User Acceptance Testing never ended.

Someone in our group forwarded my "Project Molasses" report to VP of I.T. Nero Ryan. Nero came to our next stand-up, held up my report, and exclaimed, "I had no idea this was happening! I will put a stop to it right now!" Nothing changed and no one ever mentioned it again. It remains that way today.

Do you think that Jack Donegan, Bill Hrisa, Larry Nelson, or Henry Thomas ever said, "I had no idea this was happening!"

Neither do I.

Dickens vs. JDA
Distance: 5   Understanding: 4%

Get
More
Coffee
Set up
Happy
Hour
Hide
from
Nero
Bet
on
Bears
Bring
some
Donuts
Take
Long
Lunch
scrumBell
Sales is complaining about response time!
CLOSED TICKETS
- add Std Cost
- add Box IDs
- add WIP Report
- add AWS API
- add XML feed
- add Dropdown
- add colors
OPEN TICKETS
- fix Std Cost
- fix Box IDs
- fix WIP Report
- fix AWS API
- fix XML feed
- fix Dropdown
- fix colors
paulaNomial
Finance is complaining about response time!
garyRiggs
Detroit is complaining about response time!
MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
What's wrong with Sales? And Finance? And Detroit?

The planners at Fasten-This, Inc. were having trouble managing their inventory and asked me for help. For years they had been using a "Min-Max" system which would tell them, "This Part is below its Minimum. Buy some more." But business had become bigger and more complex and Min-Max didn't work as well anymore. They wanted to forecast ahead proactively instead of responding to computer messages.

So I wrote them a program I named "Dickens", modeled after the "Ghost of Christmas Future" in "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens. Instead of saying, "Buy some more," Dickens asked, "If you continue your current behavior, where will you be in six months? In one year? In three years?" It showed past behavior, current status, and possible future outcomes of Perpetual Inventory based on operator suggestions. It displayed everything with graphs and colors and gave the operator a dozen keys to press to affect future behavior.

Dickens was a big hit. The users loved it and soon couldn't plan their inventory without it. I was named "Employee of the Month" and got a certificate and a t-shirt (but no parking space or free lunch). It saved Fasten-This millions of dollars until we were acquired by a larger conglomerate. They decided that Dickens was "not professional looking enough" and shoved JDA, a new best of greed Inventory Planning system down our throats. JDA cost millions of dollars, took years to become functional, and was never right. Its recommendations were so bad that the planners quit using it.

They begged me to convince Nero Williams, our new Vice President of I.T., to turn off JDA and keep Dickens. So I printed both JDA and Dickens recommentation screens for one of our most popular products. Dickens was right on. JDA was way off. I showed this to Nero, saying, "We have a big problem." He looked at the different results and said, "OK, I'll arrange a meeting so we can get to the bottom of this!"

A week later Nero had lunch catered for a concerned group, but did something I couldn't believe. Instead of having me present my two screens and explain the problem, he had one of the JDA people do it. They had no idea what was going on and said that the problem was that Dickens didn't match JDA. So Nero asked, "What's wrong with Dickens?" That's when I finally understood that the real problem was Nero. So I did the only thing that made any sense. I got up, grabbed two more sandwiches and five cookies and left. Nero was eventually fired, JDA was sunsetted, and Dickens is still the inventory planning system of record.

Why do we have so many I.T. leaders with no idea what's going on? Why did I have to tell Nero about a $50 million problem? And why did he still not understand it.

If Fasten-This had hired professional musician Steve Long instead of Nero Williams to be Vice President of I.T., they'd probably be $100 million dollars ahead today. Why? Because even though he knew little about I.T., Steve had Pulse. Nero didn't.

Layoffs
Distance: 9   Understanding: 1%

MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
I laid off Julie, Fred, and Denise.
kimLee
What?!? Their the only ones who know how to do AWS!
MISSION STATEMENT
If you're reading this, you're the first person who ever did.
ORG CHART
I'm the boss. You're not.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
lol lol lol lol
neroFiddler
No one is indispensible.
helenWaite
Amazon just closed our AWS account for incompetence.

As technical lead at Megacrap, I received Business Requirements (What?) from a Business Analyst and wrote Technical Specs (How?) for every project. Before any next steps, I sent all the Business Requirements to Trish Malone and all Technical Specs to Debbie Johnson.

Trish had been with Megacrap for 35 years and was the Subject Matter Expert for almost everything. She looked for oversights in the Requirements, finding them about half the time. "This won't work in Europe." "You have to add Standard Cost for the subsidiaries." "We don't do walk-throughs for Military any more, so you'll have to do something different for them." She found stuff no one else would have ever found and saved our bacon every day.

Debbie was the first programmer at Megacrap and after 27 years knew every application inside out. Like Trish, Debbie found mistakes no one else would have found. "Your units of measure won't work for powers of 10." "We already have an address modulator. Look here..." "You'll have to rebuild the Data Blaster if you do it like that." Other programmers referred to Debbie as the "google of Megacrap".

I was stunned at our monthly "all-hands" I.T. meeting when Nero Barksdale, Vice President of I.T., announced that he had laid off Trish and Debbie. He gave some idiotic corporatese reasons like "pruning the branches of the org chart", "reducing redundancy", and "moving forward". This was all clearly baloney and made no sense.

Nero obviously had no idea what Trish and Debbie did and how valuable they were. Neither did anyone advising him. The outrage was overwhelming, but nothing would change. Nero would not admit that he was wrong, so everyone suffered.

Because of the layoff snafu and many other reasons, Nero soon joined Trish and Debbie in unemployment. All because he was too lazy to grow a Pulse.

If you don't have your finger on the pulse of your operation,
find someone who does!

My favorite part of any interview is when the interviewer asks, "Do you have any questions?" I always respond, "You bet I do!" To me, an interview is always a two-way affair and the best chance for me to learn about them. I'm less interested in the company or the job than my prospective boss. There's a limit to how much I can affect the company and I can always find a way to make my job better. But a mistake marrying the wrong boss can be almost as tramatic as a mistake marrying the wrong spouse. (My wife keeps reminding me.)

I rarely ask anything that would provide insight about how smart my boss is, or what he has accomplished, or what she believes, or how things will be run. I want a good barometer of how well they "manage". Not their track record. Not their work history. And most certainly not their LunkedIn profile (which I've already seen and realized that it's just like everyone else's: a contrived commercial).

What I really want to know is how well my boss has a finger on the pulse of the operation. So I ask questions like, "Do you have source code to xyz?" "How many programs are in your repository?" "What do your code standards say about early exits?" "How many critical applications were written by people no longer here?" And, of course, my personal favorite, "What are you working on?" You kinda get the idea... I don't care what the answers are. I do care if the interviewer has an answer. Any good manager should know the answer to every one of my questions. But I'd settle for half. If anyone knew more that half of these answers, I usually took the job. That's how important Pulse is.

"How long does it take to do my hair?
I don't know. I'm never there." - Dolly Parton

wandaWant
We have specs! Julie asked Norma Jean to ask Fred.
And he heard Bill tell Linda what Shirley asked Joe.
kimLee
So what did they say?
wandaWant
I dunno.
I forgot.

It's no coincidence that the best managers are the ones with the best Pulse. It's not correlation. It's Cause and Effect and it only makes sense. If you know what's going on, you're that much more likely to make right decisions.

The non-I.T. world is full of Jack Donegans, Bill Hrisas, Larry Nelsons, Henry Thomases, and Steve Longs. Sadly, the I.T. world is full of Neros. And the solution is deceptively easy: get up off your butt and find out what's going on. If you still don't know, ask someone who does, which isn't that hard in I.T. That's your job!

Study Questions

1. Who at your work has the strongest Pulse? Give some examples. How does their Pulse help you and your team?

2. Who at your work has the weakest Pulse? Give some examples. How does their lack of Pulse make you and your team miserable?

3. On a scale from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), where would you rate your own Pulse? What is the number one thing you can do to raise that one level?

4. How important is Pulse to your company's leadership? Why?

5. On a scale from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), where would you rate the Pulse of your boss? What is the number one thing you can do to help raise their Pulse one level without going to jail?

Quiz

1. Which is the biggest reason a manager would not have strong Pulse?
 a. They're lazy.
 b. They're stupid.
 c. They don't think it matters.
 d. They already have their credentials. So what?
 e. Their own manager doesn't care.


2. Which is the best question to assess your interviewer's Pulse?
 a. How many years have you worked here?
 b. What's the best project you have ever done?
 c. Where will I be five years from now?
 d. Where is the closest Chinese buffet?
 e. What is the #1 programmer working on? When will they be done?


3. Why did Jack Donegan have such strong Pulse?
 a. It was too risky for him not to.
 b. He was naturally curious.
 c. He couldn't imagine any other way.
 d. His mother didn't breastfeed him so he's still looking for her.
 e. all of the above


4. What should you do if you notice something no one else has noticed?
 a. Tell someone.
 b. Try to understand why.
 c. Figure out how important it is.
 d. Holler, "Dude! Check it out!"
 e. all of the above


5. Which is a good way to keep your "finger on the pulse" of things?
 a. sight
 b. sound
 c. gut feeling
 d. Russian hackers
 e. all of the above

You May Also Like

Eddie's Law of Empathy
The best way to understand the other is to have been the other.

Eddie's Law of Depth
Understanding is directly related to the square of the distance below the surface.

How Chem Lab Made Me a Better Developer
(It had nothing to do with chemistry.)

Insidious Bug or Comedy of Errors?
Just another day in the nest

It Takes 6 Days to Change 1 Line of Code
I love programming. It's the process I can't stand.


edw519 at gmail
Y in